Make Yourself A Tough Out!!!

Stay In Attack Mode!!!

There Are No Plateaus!!!

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My Teaching Principles

The approach I take with young hitters is not to tell them what mechanic they need to perform. I promote a thought process while putting them in certain positions of strength until the mechanic I am looking for is accomplished. The idea is to get them to think in a more natural way to produce a movement that comes natural to the individual. Not one of my students swings the same way yet they all accomplish the basic goals we are looking for in a swing.

Here are the simple rules I use for all my students of all ages from as low as 6 years old up through College and Professional Hitters.

 

The goal of the hitter is to HIT THE BALL HARD

Accelerate through contact

Don’t sacrifice bat speed for contact

Stay in attack mode

Stay plugged in, meaning maintain strength position throughout the swing

 

Each one of these simple rules is elaborated on as they move through the system and mature both mentally and physically. We will also go beyond these simple rules but NOT until they accomplish these effectively. Approach at the plate and pitch selection is commonly spoken of in my cage. With that we spend a lot of time in game situation simulations where the pitching they see is going to be more difficult than what they will see during their next game. The objective is to overcome the best pitching in the league. I always ask my hitters this question, especially the ones going through the scouting/recruiting process. What does it take to be considered a good hitter?

The answer is pretty simple. Compete against good pitching.

"Caleb has the disposition, personality and knowledge to help your player improve."

-Tom Brunansky, Minnesota Twins Hitting Coach

"If you're ready to work hard and take your game to the next level, Coach Caleb can get you there!"

-Kevin Newman, Pittsburgh Pirates

"Coach Caleb knows how to work with what each hitter needs and does a great job at keeping it simple at the plate."

-Marco Young, University of Oregon